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Onsite Cinema
Films | 16th Aug | On loop 11-4 Films 
 

Amelia Crouch  |  Title: Double Over |  Length: 1 min 26 sec  |

Double Over is a short video of hands manipulating a 'magic cube' – a cuboid structure made up of 8 smaller cubes that can be folded and combined in various configurations. The faces of the smaller cubes display words or images of hand gestures. As the structure is manipulated these combine to offer different readings that refer to the cube and it's movement, but also suggest extraneous meanings and refer to the artwork's existence as a video object.

 

Martha Jurksaitis  |  Title: Peach |  Length: 11:34  |

 

 

Synaesthesia is an experience of cross-modal sensuality - 'hearing pink', 'seeing green', tasting shapes or feeling sounds. I think we are all latently synaesthetic, and that a cinematic work has the capacity to bring about a synaesthetic experience if it is made in a personal, artisanal and ethical way, when the filmmaker and the filmed material sensually respond to one another. 'Peach' is an attempt at making a piece of 'Synaesthetic Cinema'.


I discovered that Jojo, my boyfriend's daughter and my lovely friend, is synaesthetic, which is something that nobody had realised. She experiences numbers and days of the week with colours, and the numbers 2, 6 and 8 all have distinct yet related colours - they are each variants of a type of orangey-peach. My method of filming and use of camera filters combined to create a peachy hue to my film, and Peach is also a nickname my mum gave me as a child, and one that I call Jojo too. 'Peach' is a personal and sensual meditation on the nature of us and the nature of film.

Shot on Super 8 and entirely processed and edited by hand.

 

Thomas Goddard  |  Title: Potential Endings - The Iceberg   | Length: 2mins 7seconds

 

 

The Iceberg is the first in the Potential Endings series. It is part of a series of flash animations that are looped cycles of natural disasters related to climate change. The animations are drawn by hand first and then using a Graphics tablet. In this animation The Iceberg slowly melts away into the ocean causing sea levels to rise leading to the second in the series The Flood. 

 

Gabrielle Tillenburg  |  Title: Fantasy Land  |  Length: 8:47  | 

 

 

Fantasy Land is an autobiographical essay film that follows the filmmaker's journey in search of a childhood memory lost somewhere in the magical world of Disney. Recalling a lost photo of a moment shared between the filmmaker and her late father at Disney World, she visits the amusement park in search of a reminder, an image, anything that might bring to mind a clear memory of a rare moment between a father and daughter. Memory and the innocence of childhood are questioned and explored as she copes with the loss of her father and an ideal childhood.

 

Penny Whitworth  |  Title: Knavesmire  |  Length: 03:14 

 

 

The slow shots in Knavesmire hold a definite photographic sensibility. Almost still images and unhurried panning shots, sequenced together to construct a gently moving whole, a meditation on space and light. Warm colours and a vintage tone are a contemporary rendition of traditional film recording processes – an iPhone pretending to be a Super 8 camera. A smoothness and luminosity discloses the modern nature of HD video and the glitches and jumps, whilst not immediately apparent, should inject small shocks of recognition in the viewer. The lack of explicit sound within the piece is also an indication of the digital/analogue juxtaposition.

The sound of a projector is an integral part of the experience of watching a Super 8 film, and yet it is absent, albeit inconspicuously so, in Knavesmire, further questioning the nature of documenting and recording processes and our expectations of them. Nevertheless, the film isn’t silent. There is an ambient audio track that could result from any point within the entire process of recording, processing, editing and finalising the project, emphasising the various levels of mediation inherent in the work.

The largely un-manipulated and clear imagery seen in Knavesmire lends it an unambiguity that enables the viewer to easily engage with the content, whilst the slowed pace and the contemplative aesthetic of the video allows the viewer time to concentrate, an act that they may potentially carry with them into their experiences beyond their encounter with the film.

 

Amelia Crouch  |  Title: Tractor Parade  |  Length: 3 minutes 55 seconds  | 

 

 

 

Video showing a sunny day, and a calm empty landscape. Then an apparently never-ending series of tractors drive through the shot. Away from the crowds and onlookers that would usually accompany such an event, the tone is dead pan. The viewer perhaps begins to compare one tractor to the next – colourful or not, old or new, large or small.

 

Suok won Yoon  |  Title: The Value  |  Length: 4 minutes 21 seconds

 

 

Sometimes I have recorded a small part of my life on a dairy or a sketchbook. Although I experience diverse emotions and situations for one day, the length of recorded story on a dairy or a sketchbook is very short. However, I believe that the recorded story has heavy weight of life.The recorded story is about conflict with myself in my UK's life. I wanted to express about conflict with myself that causes in my inner for one day like a diary.

Thereby, I expressed about these conflicts with myself that caused for one day during make a sentence on diary.

 

Martha Jurksaitis  |  Title: The Garden of Polymitas  |  Length: 09:30

 

A film inspired by deep listening of Pauline Oliveros’ music and the sublime stillness of Franco Piavoli’s cinema, made by two friends exploring whether we would be creative together or not. A fertile collaborative relationship developed, and we now make work as ‘Polymitas’. Super 8 filmmaking by Martha Jurksaitis (Cherry Kino) and music and sound by Kathy Alberici, featuring additional guitar by Calvin Xang.

 

 

 

Thomas Goddard  |  Title: Potential Endings - The Flood   | Length: 52 Seconds

 

The Flood is the second in the Potential Endings series. In this animation the waves rock continuously back and forth. For Potential Endings I chose iconic representations of natural disasters that are repeatedly represented throughout history for example in Mesopotamian flood stories like The Epic of Gilgamesh or depictions such as John Martin’s The Deluge (1834). 

 

Thomas Goddard  |  Title: Potential Endings - The Comet   | Length: 27 Seconds

 

The Comet is the third in the Potential Endings series. In this animation The Comet speeds into view, burning up as it enters the Earth’s atmosphere. For Potential Endings I chose iconic representations of natural disasters that are repeated throughout art history such as Haley’s Comet being represented in Giotto’s Adoration of the Magi circa 1305. 

 

Thomas Goddard  |  Title: Potential Endings - The Flames   | Length: 1min 7 Seconds

 

The Flames is the final part in the Potential Endings series. In this animation a fire grows from a single flame until it engulfs the entire screen like a wildfire. The Potential Endings series plays on the idea of extinction by using the now obsolete software Macromedia Flash.

 

Martha Jurksaitis  |  Title: Attraction  |  Length: 11:16  

 

 

This is about attraction. The attraction I feel towards working with analogue film, and the way artist's cinema and its history have many similarities with fairground attractions. My film is also about physical attraction, chemistry, that thing that just pulls you towards someone and that it's impossible to hide. It's almost a smell, I think.

I filmed the material at a variety of different fairs and circuses, in the UK and France. The soundtrack is composed of recordings I made of a leather skirt, Super 8 and 16mm film projectors, and a brilliant old street piano that is wildly out of tune, housed at Abbey House Museum in Kirkstall.

'I went to the fair that night
without a clue
that I'd fall in love
with the curve of your shoulder
and never see straight again' 

 

Martha Jurksaitis  |  Title: Alana and the Carnival |  Length: 03:44  

 

Shot on Super 8 film at Chapeltown Carnival, edited entirely in camera, and processed by hand at the Cherry Kino Lab.


Penny Whitworth  Title: Knavesmire  |  Length: 03:14

 

 

The slow shots in Knavesmire hold a definite photographic sensibility. Almost still images and unhurried panning shots, sequenced together to construct a gently moving whole, a meditation on space and light. Warm colours and a vintage tone are a contemporary rendition of traditional film recording processes – an iPhone pretending to be a Super 8 camera. A smoothness and luminosity discloses the modern nature of HD video and the glitches and jumps, whilst not immediately apparent, should inject small shocks of recognition in the viewer. The lack of explicit sound within the piece is also an indication of the digital/analogue juxtaposition. The sound of a projector is an integral part of the experience of watching a Super 8 film, and yet it is absent, albeit inconspicuously so, in Knavesmire, further questioning the nature of documenting and recording processes and our expectations of them. Nevertheless, the film isn’t silent. There is an ambient audio track that could result from any point within the entire process of recording, processing, editing and finalising the project, emphasising the various levels of mediation inherent in the work.


The largely un-manipulated and clear imagery seen in Knavesmire lends it an unambiguity that enables the viewer to easily engage with the content, whilst the slowed pace and the contemplative aesthetic of the video allows the viewer time to concentrate, an act that they may potentially carry with them into their experiences beyond their encounter with the film.

 

 

Jackie Parsons | Tomorrow's Here Right Now | Lenght: 3:08

 

Life on our planet is a fragile and beautiful thing - indifference will be its downfall.

Composed by Jackie Parsons constructed with the help of garageband, imovie and found footage. March 2014

 

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